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Using PhotoBucket temporarily while I can't SCP things into Ringil:


14:58 CDT 2004-10-23, Geneva Drive, Manhattan, KS

Well, I'm clearly no Larry Kanfer, but there's something about the turning of the seasons that makes me eager to go running with a digicam.


Meet Telperion, my Autumn Glory maple. I got this tree as a sapling in 1999, when its trunk was less than 2cm in diameter. The trunk is easily 8cm in diameter now.






Wibble on "Home", last night's (S4x04) episode of Enterprise, to appear shortly in a cut.

Edit, 19:05 CDT: Here's one from lilithharp17.



You Are a Pundit Blogger!



Your blog is smart, insightful, and always a quality read.
Truly appreciated by many, surpassed by only a few.




Edit, 19:35 CDT: Here's a meme from tv_elf:

The TMI Meme

1. Tell me something obvious about yourself.
I am a first-generation American-born Asian.

2. Tell me something about yourself that I don't know.
Have to think about this one.
ETA: As you can tell from what I wear and carry around, I spend money liberally on technology and frugally on my own wardrobe. My notebook computers run from $800 to $4500 each, while I don't own a pair of jeans. I am, however, pretty much a middle-of-the-road guy when it comes to my car, house, furniture, and travel.

3. What is your biggest fear?
Rejection and being left out.

4. Do you normally take the safe route or the shortcut?
Either-or. Safe route on highways, shortcuts in the abstract sense.

5. What is the one thing you want the most that you can't buy with money?
Love. I know, I'm a walking, teunceing cliche. :-D

6. What is your most treasured possession?
Hard to say. I guess that besides my house, it would be my ThinkPad A31p (Pentium 4, 1.7 GHz), Numerramar.

7. What is the one thing you hate most about yourself that you do the most often?
This would be a toss-up between putting my foot in my mouth or annoying people (especially online) with out-of-place remarks, and procrastinating on critical tasks until they are very late.

8. Tell me something about you sexually that I don't know.
I have written erotic stories before.

9. Tell me something about you sexually that everybody knows.
On the Kinsey scale, I am a 0 (exclusively heterosexual).

10. What is your favorite lie to tell?
I don't lie intentionally.
But the promise I break most frequently is:
"I'll finish it today."

11. Name something you have done once that you can't wait to do again.
Attended an SF convention.

12. Are you the jealous type?
Never.

13. What is the one person, place or thing that you can never say no to?
Person: lots of people in teunc and CRG
Place: #teunc (virtual), home (local), Canada (abroad)
Thing: ice cream

14. What is the nicest thing someone has ever done for you?
Told me they loved me. Told me they didn't.

15. If you could do something crazy right now, what would it be?
I'd go to Shanxi, China. (thanatos_kalos and Fedora know what I'm talking about.)

16. When was the last time you cried?
Honestly, I can't remember.
ETA: Late last year.

17. When was the last time you felt so good that nothing else mattered?
Probably last month after the Statewide EPSCoR Conference, when I learned we had gotten the NSF ITR grant.

18. Do you feel comfortable in public with no shirt on?
It depends. At the beach or at the pool, yes. Most other public places, I'd feel out of place.

19. Name something embarrassing you did while drunk.
I've never been drunk enough to do anything embarrassing.

20. If you post this in your journal, do you want me to answer it?
Sure.


--
Banazir

Comments

( 10 comments — Leave a comment )
sui_degeneris
Oct. 23rd, 2004 05:42 pm (UTC)
Hey, I'm a pundit blogger too!
Evidently, that quiz is severely flawed...

Or I was lying.

Must think about this.

Nice tree. There's something about photos of manicured merkian suburbia that gets to me. Makes me want to put on an apron, and make pumpkin pie.

A gingham apron.

Good grief. I'm hosting Thanksgiving this year... And I have no idea what I'm making. Well, aside from the turkey.

P'raps I should start thinking about the menu.

And stop thinking about gingham aprons.

And houses in suburbia.
banazir
Oct. 23rd, 2004 06:11 pm (UTC)
Re: Hey, I'm a pundit blogger too!
Evidently, that quiz is severely flawed...
Or I was lying.
Must think about this.

Well, everybody and her LJ friends are pundit bloggers.
FWIW, though, I rather enjoy your blog.

Nice tree. There's something about photos of manicured merkian suburbia that gets to me. Makes me want to put on an apron, and make pumpkin pie.
Makes me want to garden (or photograph). I should be mowing the lawn more, is what.

A gingham apron.
Good grief. I'm hosting Thanksgiving this year... And I have no idea what I'm making. Well, aside from the turkey.
P'raps I should start thinking about the menu.
And stop thinking about gingham aprons.
And houses in suburbia.

This is all very Deputy MOM.
Tell me, sui_degeneris, how many months takes it to make a steward a MOM, if the MOM returneth knot?

New quiz up, BTW.

--
Banazir
sui_degeneris
Oct. 23rd, 2004 10:40 pm (UTC)
Thank you.
Well, the traditional timeframe to make a mom is 9 months.

Not sure if that holds true for MOMs, too. But if it does...

Then I need to look back at my records to see when istari_ala first called me Deputy MOM.

In the meantime, I've done the TMI meme.

And now I'm off to bed. To dream of gingham aprons.
banazir
Oct. 24th, 2004 07:04 pm (UTC)
The Mythical MOM-Month
Well, the traditional timeframe to make a mom is 9 months.
Not sure if that holds true for MOMs, too. But if it does...

I know it wouldn't be less.

Now, I was kindasorta expecting the "Knot long, in places of less honour. In teunc ten thousand yeats would knot suffice" amser.

In the meantime, I've done the TMI meme.
Cllo. (I see you have since consolidated it.)

And now I'm off to bed. To dream of gingham aprons.
So, I had to look up gingham. Here is what Google shows me as an image for it. Gee, wonder where my attention was drawn, hein? Heh.

--
Banazir
sui_degeneris
Oct. 25th, 2004 10:11 am (UTC)
Re: The Mythical MOM-Month
Well, you see, I would have had to look the quote up to get the phrasing right, and I'm inherently lazy.

(And since MOM (to my admittedly incomplete knowledge) never participated in teunc, I wouldn't have linked to it. Might have linked to the yahoogroup page, though.)

LOL at google images. Yep. I think I can pick the image that caught your eye. Had to click through four times to see anything that actually displayed anything ginghammy clearly, but hey, that's life!

(And you might want to check your answer to question 9. The number and the words don't match.)
banazir
Oct. 25th, 2004 10:40 am (UTC)
Freudian mekistakors
Well, you see, I would have had to look the quote up to get the phrasing right, and I'm inherently lazy.
Me too; I just like that quote. :)

(And since MOM (to my admittedly incomplete knowledge) never participated in teunc, I wouldn't have linked to it. Might have linked to the yahoogroup page, though.)
Wlokay, "in TEUNC, ten thousand yeats would knot suffice".

LOL at google images. Yep. I think I can pick the image that caught your eye. Had to click through four times to see anything that actually displayed anything ginghammy clearly, but hey, that's life!
Oh, I looked veeeeeeery carefully for the gingham, believe you me.
Heh.

(And you might want to check your answer to question 9. The number and the words don't match.)
D'oh, that'll teach me.
No, no torrid affairs with my clones.
That should have been "0". (And you'd think a computer scientist would know to count from 0. Or read, for that matter.)

--
Banazir
r3turn0
Oct. 23rd, 2004 07:04 pm (UTC)
Off subject-Colleges
Hi, I am relatively new to LJ, but I found you while stumbling around on this site and found your analyis of the CS curriculum interesting.
I am attending a two year technical college in Texas.I was wondering what your thoughts are on these types of schools as compared to regular Universities.Should I make the switch to a traditional school with a good curriculum?
banazir
Oct. 23rd, 2004 09:13 pm (UTC)
Welcome!
Feel free to friend me if you like, and I'll do the same.

To answer your question: It depends on the curriculum of the technical college and the skills you are trying to develop. A 4-year university degree is useful if you want to have more versatility in a job market that changes fairly rapidly.

Oftentimes, though, universities and vocational/technical colleges serve different clientele (with some overlap). If you have ambitions of postgraduate study, working in research, or just building a more eell-rounded scientific background, then a university degree might help. There are no universal answers, but those are my personal impressions.

--
Banazir
r3turn0
Oct. 24th, 2004 04:23 am (UTC)
Re: Welcome!
Thank you! I have friended you...
My schools CS program in general http://cstnt.tstc.edu/cst_degree.html
and my specific course outline http://cstnt.tstc.edu/cst_degree_2004.html#cs is what I am taking now.
This school is application intensive with hundreds of hours of actual coding.Every lab assignment is writing programs (3 to 5 per week). Personally I love it.I know four year schools do not usually have this much hands on but seem to stress the theory. I am starting to believe more of the hands on would help traditional Institutions forge a better curriculum.But then again, thats just a personal preference.Coder at heart here...
BTW- your blog is excellent!
banazir
Oct. 24th, 2004 06:34 pm (UTC)
Thanks for the links
I read through your curriculum - it looks interesting.
It's definitely slanted towards development. I think it's good for training specialized developers.

I'm personally of mixed minds about technical programming (e.g., scripting languages), IT administration, DBA, and media computation courses that are tied to specific platforms. On the one hand, it isn't reasonable for us to expect that students can enter the workforce trained to develop on a specific platform or using a particular software package, without getting lab time and practical (fully-guided or independent) experiences. On the other hand, it is oftentimes the case that we can, and should, train students to understand fundamental theory and principles, so that they "learn to fish".

It is said that the half-life of engineering knowledge is 5 years - that is, half of the specific technical skills you have will be functionally obsolete in five years. This might seem a bit pessimistic, but think about all of the compscibooks, trade books especially, and also journals and magazines, that you read every year.

Have you seen my threads on CS education?

Restructuring the CS curriculum - thoughts from Dave Schmidt
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/10/09/

Virtuosity - showing off, encouragement
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/02/12/
Wake up and smell the Matrix - mentoring CS students, the straight dope
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2003/12/11/

Dictionopolis vs. Digitopolis - CS and the arts and humanities
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/09/17/
Bioinformatics for quixotics - CS and the life sciences in the large
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/09/18/

Attrition of women in computing fields
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/03/27/
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs for young women
  http://www.livejournal.com/users/banazir/2004/09/14/

BTW- your blog is excellent!
Thanks, and I'm glad to have your comments.

--
Banazir
( 10 comments — Leave a comment )

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