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Deadly yet beautiful



Protein secondary fold visualization (cartoon & group view) of Phospholipase A2 (Pla2) from the venom of Naja naja, the Indian cobra.
Segelke, B. W., Nguyen, D., Chee, R., Xuong, N. H., Dennis, E. A.: Structures of two novel crystal forms of Naja naja naja phospholipase A2 lacking Ca2+ reveal trimeric packing. J Mol Biol 279 pp. 223 (1998)
1A3D from the Protein Data Bank
Visualized using OpenRasMol v2.7.2.1


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Banazir

Comments

( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
casecob
Jun. 21st, 2005 11:06 am (UTC)
This is one of my favorites...
<img src="http://vorlon.case.edu/~jmf32/Images/TIM.JPG> TIM Barrels are so cool because unlike just about any other protein you'll find, they have crazily diverse biological functions (as opposed to just one). I think it's up to 16 now?
casecob
Jun. 21st, 2005 11:08 am (UTC)


Didn't post that correctly.

It's on of my favorites because it's biological function is incredibly diverse. Instead of one function, TIM Barrels have had 16 distinct functions discovered.

They're so cool - hurray for mitochondria ;)
banazir
Jun. 21st, 2005 03:43 pm (UTC)
PDB ID?
Thanks! What's the PDB ID?

--
Banazir
azhure
Jun. 21st, 2005 12:28 pm (UTC)
Man, I miss playing around with 3d models...
banazir
Jun. 21st, 2005 03:44 pm (UTC)
3-D models
What kind of 3-D models.

Your icon wins. Seriously. Woman with a sword (nice dress and hair, BTW), scientist (nice glasses, BTW), River quote. Absolutely slays.

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Banazir
azhure
Jun. 22nd, 2005 02:04 am (UTC)
Re: 3-D models
I didn't ever get to do any actual generation of models, unfortunately. Just playing around with models of protein allergens mostly, examining surface epitopes.
auriam
Jun. 22nd, 2005 07:09 am (UTC)
Proteins vs. proteins... who can replicate, and who can stop that replication? That's what our lives come down to on the molecular level. It's so strange to think about such tiny and numerous objects being combined to make something as complex as ourselves... and to think that we're so vulnerable to such simple little tinkertoys.
auriam
Jun. 22nd, 2005 07:14 am (UTC)
Oh, and did you ever see a vis of the death proteins in ricin and abrin? They're enormous molecules with two chains; one to enter a cell and the other to shut off protein synthesis. Intricate and oh so deadly... amazing to think how much time and how many interactions it must have taken for plants to evolve such poisons...

Interesting also, if you look at the list of the most toxic poisons, is that bacteria produce most of the creme-de-la-creme... one would think that bacteria would need LESS toxicity in order to maximize their survival without killing their hosts... perhaps it's just a coincidence that a waste chemical they produce that doesn't harm their chosen host species affects us negatively.
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )

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