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The Eagles Are Coming

I was at a Graduate Council Academic Affairs committee meeting today, and spotted a couple of typos:

A paragraph on postdocs in Chapter 1 appeared again verbatim in Chapter 6;
in the meeting notes, the physics department listed the outcome of a vote as "20.00 yea, 0.00 nay, 2.00 non-voting".

I noted the first, and was called first a speed reader (which I haven't been for decades; I had a 200-400wpm reading rate as a 4th grader, and it's dropped to a very slow rate over the years) and then "sharp". :blink: Funny, I feel about as dull as a crysknife left out in the desert this week.

Then I remarked that the physics department seems to use a rather excessive number of significant digits for a vote. (Perhaps it's to account for people being only half there? Or is there really such a thing as π abstinences?)

My mathematician colleague: "I didn't catch that, Bill --- I don't have your eagle eyes." ::is amused::

That's the first time anyone here's accused me of being eagle-eyed, is what. *g*

Edit, 10:30 CDT Wed 20 Oct 2004: Commonalities, gacked from jereeza and cross-posted from teunc...


How common are banazir's interests
Universal
books (187437)
computers (266008)
friends (337801)
music (821354)
poetry (197998)
reading (352824)
singing (195957)
writing (351052)
Popular
fantasy (63566)
lord of the rings (93179)
Common
angel (23615)
chinese food (31451)
christianity (20465)
disney (23711)
fanfiction (32071)
films (23863)
god (46819)
linux (13560)
literature (44230)
livejournal (23313)
peace (28787)
programming (17718)
science fiction (32066)
shakespeare (30453)
star wars (42702)
tolkien (16506)
tori amos (43852)
Specialist
anne mccaffrey (1725)
anti-racism (3573)
artificial intelligence (2544)
asia (3706)
computer graphics (3327)
computer science (3010)
dune (5201)
ecology (2342)
folk music (5889)
hobbits (9365)
jedi (1509)
kansas (2087)
lestat (4233)
mathematics (5012)
mercedes lackey (2871)
mmorpg (1179)
narnia (2324)
open source (1996)
orson scott card (3887)
pacifism (2471)
pixar (1997)
research (3369)
robotics (1730)
statistics (1372)
Unusual
algorithms (548)
angband (157)
anti-spam (49)
arrakis (82)
artificial neural networks (20)
asian americans (74)
bayesian networks (17)
beowulf clusters (21)
bioinformatics (265)
c. s. lewis (632)
children of dune (305)
computational geometry (14)
dan simmons (344)
data mining (103)
decision theory (21)
distributed computing (145)
dorothy sayers (240)
drosophila (30)
evolutionary computation (23)
free software (709)
genetic algorithms (148)
genetic programming (62)
genomics (82)
grant writing (30)
graph theory (128)
inference (24)
information visualization (22)
julian may (117)
lightsabers (926)
lloyd alexander (368)
machine learning (109)
microarrays (11)
middle-earth (978)
monte carlo (169)
nonviolence (581)
peace and justice (32)
probability (243)
prydain (108)
roguelikes (60)
semantic web (53)
simulation (141)
sourceforge (77)
stochastic processes (11)
technical writing (240)
teunc (19)
Rare
arabidopsis (8)
data visualization (7)
ecumenicism (8)
scientific visualization (4)
time series (9)

Enter username:

InterestRank was bought to you by _imran_ and MemeLand.org



LOL. I like that god is common, lord of the rings is popular, but computers are universal.

--
Banazir

Comments

( 11 comments — Leave a comment )
narvi
Oct. 19th, 2004 08:44 pm (UTC)
How can a person only be half there?
banazir
Oct. 19th, 2004 09:01 pm (UTC)
Figuratively speaking, m'lad
... as in absent-minded.

*blink*

What were we talking about?

--
Banazir
chaosinaskirt
Oct. 19th, 2004 10:08 pm (UTC)
Re: Figuratively speaking, m'lad
what about there in spirit but not in body? :D
banazir
Oct. 20th, 2004 01:32 am (UTC)
A bird in the spirit is worth two in the body
what about there in spirit but not in body? :D
I would animate it for hooours?

Nice to meet you, BTW. I see you've friended me.
How do you do?

--
Banazir
twinofhugin
Oct. 19th, 2004 09:14 pm (UTC)
Hey, I just noticed your livejournal (when you made a post in algorithms, actually) and would like to friend you. If you want to friend me back, that'd be cool.

I'm a network security analyst for a large company, and a freelance programmer and security analyst, and a student of classical computer science.
banazir
Oct. 19th, 2004 09:16 pm (UTC)
Nice to meet you
Hey, I just noticed your livejournal (when you made a post in algorithms, actually) and would like to friend you. If you want to friend me back, that'd be cool.
Be my guest!

Hey, you aren't related to huginn, are you?

I'm a network security analyst for a large company, and a freelance programmer and security analyst, and a student of classical computer science.
Very good - but what's "classical" CS?

--
Banazir
twinofhugin
Oct. 19th, 2004 09:24 pm (UTC)
Re: Nice to meet you
I'd consider 'classical' computer science to be more, well, in-depth. One of the major irritations I have is lots of programmers learning languages like say C# or Java, but not C or ASM. The obfuscation that those languages provides is useful for ease of application development, but using them to teach concepts is, in my humble opinion, not best for grasping concepts.

I guess I don't like work being hidden. I'm weird.

And no, I'm more related to twinofmunin.
banazir
Oct. 20th, 2004 01:39 am (UTC)
Classical CS
I'd consider 'classical' computer science to be more, well, in-depth. One of the major irritations I have is lots of programmers learning languages like say C# or Java, but not C or ASM.
So here, you mean low-level programmers rather than factory (component) software developers?

The obfuscation that those languages provides is useful for ease of application development, but using them to teach concepts is, in my humble opinion, not best for grasping concepts.
I agree with the latter, but how do you mean "obfuscation"?
Representation hiding?

I guess I don't like work being hidden. I'm weird.
Well, that depends. Would you say you are against strong typing (representation independence, no coercion or ad hoc type equivalence)?

--
Banazir

twinofhugin
Oct. 20th, 2004 02:54 am (UTC)
Re: Classical CS
Well say in Java, you have functions to implement all the data structures and sorting/searching algorithms you need, yet, without a fundamental understanding of what these things do you've never, as a programmer, going to be able to understand why one choice is better than the other, and under what conditions different data representation methods are more efficient than others.

This also ties into what I termed 'obfuscation' of programming concepts, such as, in the Java API there are functions to create binary tree, linked list, and doubly linked list data storage structures. From a practical programming standpoint, anyone can pick these up and run with them without having to understand them, yet, without understanding how these things work, and what their implementations of these pieces of logic actually do, they are much more likely to write buggy and / or inefficient software. Granted, my job security is based on their being people writing bad code, I shouldn't complain too loudly I guess... but then again it's the 'scientist' I suppose in me speaking out for perfection.

Really my work-hiding comment was more directed at the Java API and programatical APIs. Granted I don't think it's the best course of action for everyone to re-invent the wheel all the time, but if you re-invent the wheel once (ideally as a student, on someone else's dollar ;) ) you have that much more understanding of how the technology and the logic works, and can implement other people's solutions more effectively.

Also I'm irritated at guys I know who started programming in C# and loved it because "Wow! Now I don't have to worry about those 'pointer' things any more, I never understood what they were anyway!"
lilithharp17
Oct. 19th, 2004 11:53 pm (UTC)
The Lily Pad and the Lotus Blossom
Many computations gather this year
In bundles all lined up with the shoes
I place at the doorway before I enter
The home of my Ancestors

The grass needs the sheep to tend to it
Outside the cottage, nestled within wooded
Land with the Squirrels so curious
Climbing up and Down and Talking non-stop

My sun is warm above ground and it filters
Through and lays its shining warmth
Upon my forehead as I write to you
My friend of Hobbits and Mankind

To think that I sit her and write of the
Beautiful dove and the feminist whine
And your machinations are all in the practical
The make believe only hints itself here & there

And my smile is serene and happy whenever
Your smile enters my friends in my journal
Because there would be many things on
Hypothesis this mind would ask you on

Simple questions that your education might
Take several levels higher in thinking and
Perhaps I could get some of life's answers
And riddles solved. One important question
Still bothers me and I'll close after asking you?
What came first? The Chicken or the Egg Sir?
banazir
Oct. 20th, 2004 01:35 am (UTC)
Chickens and Eggs
It depends on what you mean by "egg".
If unicelluar evolutionary answers, count, then definitely the egg.
Otherwise I'd still go with eggs in the spirit of speciation.

Thanks for the poetic greeting. How do you do?

--
Banazir
( 11 comments — Leave a comment )

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