Banazîr the Jedi Hobbit (banazir) wrote,
Banazîr the Jedi Hobbit
banazir

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Tronkie Nostalgia: Apple //c, TI 99-4a, Atari 800, TRS-80, C64



Apple //c & //c+
Introduced in April of 1984, the Apple IIc was the first compact Apple II. It came in a small white case, and was built around an enhanced 65C02 processor, running at 1.4 MHz. It had 128 kB RAM, (expandable to 1 MB) a built-in 5.25" floppy drive on the side, and could be used with a mouse. The Apple IIc+ was introduced in 1988, with a 4 MHz 65C02, RAM expandable to over 1 MB, a larger ROM, and an optional internal 800 kB 3.5" drive. The Apple IIc+ was discontinued in November of 1990.

This was the computer I wanted to work my first job for - the one I was going to use to take over the world. (How? Haven't you folks ever watched Automan and Starman?)

I seem to remember a CompuServe Magazine (then called Online Today) article about a guy who rode a recumbent bike cross-country c. 1986, blogging from a //c that he charged from a solar panel, and dialing into CompuServe via a cellular modem. Does anyone remember (or better yet, does anyone have) this article?

My first computer was a TI 99-4a (16Kb RAM) that my parents got on my tenth birthday. The same day, we went to NYC (the only time I've ever been to the Big Apple) and my uncle made my parents exchange the TI two days later for an Atari 800 (64Kb RAM, built-in BASIC). I used TRS-80s ("trash eighties"), Apple ][e and later ][gs systems, Commodore 64s with their slick bitblt sprite systems; and I admired the Amiga and Coleco Adam from afar. But nothing quite matched the thrill of taking an audio cassette backup of a BASIC program and... playing it in a tape deck. *tronkie squee*

Sing it with me, now:
"Hey, hey, 16K!"

# It made a generation who can code... #

--
Banazir
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