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Religion quiz

According to the SelectSmart.com Belief System Selector, my #1 belief match is Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants. </br> What do you believe?</b></a> Visit SelectSmart.com/RELIGION


Interesting...

1. Mainline - Liberal Christian Protestants (100%)
2. Orthodox Quaker (99%)
3. Mainline - Conservative Christian Protestant (97%)
4. Seventh Day Adventist (96%)
5. Eastern Orthodox (78%)
6. Roman Catholic (78%)


7. Liberal Quakers (70%)
8. Unitarian Universalism (65%)
9. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (63%)
10. Sikhism (54%)
11. Hinduism (53%)
12. Bahá'í Faith (52%)
13. Reform Judaism (52%)
14. Jehovah's Witness (51%)
15. Orthodox Judaism (51%)
16. Neo-Pagan (46%)
17. Islam (45%)
18. Mahayana Buddhism (41%)
19. Theravada Buddhism (41%)
20. Jainism (40%)
21. New Age (35%)
22. Secular Humanism (31%)
23. Scientology (30%)
24. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (29%)
25. Taoism (29%)
26. Non-theist (25%)
27. New Thought (20%)

I was intrigued that "Neo-Pagan" came up higher than "Islam" on my list.
I was also amazzled that I kept flip-flopping between "Mainline/Liberal Protestant" and "Mainline/Conservative Protestant", but I assume this means fundamentalism (in the traditional as opposed to the political one, acos I sure as trask am knot a plotical conservative).


Apparently I'm a Tolkien mooderate as well:
You are a Tolkien Moderate
TOLKIEN MODERATE:
Live and let live is your rule of life. You like
Tolkien, you don't have any great desire to be
a deconstructionist or an iconoclast, but
neither are you going to tell anyone else what
to do in their fannish pursuits. In your
pursuit of moderation and keeping the peace,
you tend to end up getting flamed by the
extremists at both ends of the spectrum.

Tolkienology 101: What is Your Tolkien Belief System?
brought to you by Quizilla

--
Banazîr

Comments

( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
andrewwyld
Jun. 7th, 2003 03:24 pm (UTC)
The hydrazine-fuelled Zen Catholics bid their selectsmartselected brethren an emphatic yo!
banazir
Jun. 7th, 2003 08:51 pm (UTC)
Suffer the lille sproglets to teunce over me
I'm knot sure wot that means, but it sounds pteery goond to me!

--
Banazir
andrewwyld
Jun. 9th, 2003 04:43 am (UTC)
Oh, just being ecumenical and friendly ....
banazir
Jun. 9th, 2003 08:01 am (UTC)
Cllo!

The only Zen Christian I've acksherly heard of is Phil Jackson (lamost wrote Peter Jackson), the coach of the Lakers and Bulls in their former dazs of glory. Mais, he isn't lawaz too Zen-liek. #-)

Tell us more aboat Zen Cahtolics, lpease?

--
Banazir
andrewwyld
Jun. 9th, 2003 08:14 am (UTC)
I sort of made that term up to describe my personal beliefs.  I'm a Catholic, alright, and I do take that seriously.  However, I've come to the view that Christ, in His teachings and His general existence, embodies the concept of rejection of false dualism which is central to Zen Buddhism, and that the Catholic church at its best continues to embody this spirit.

For example, the concept of being God and man at the same time is a paradox in some ways -- as is the concept of God becoming bread as is supposed to happen in communion.  These concepts are so confusing that they are often conflated, leading to occasional assertions of cannibalism (as though God became man as an intermediate step to becoming bread, whereas these are, in fact, somewhat separate).  However, we ourselves embody this paradox daily in that we are sentient -- more traditionally, spirit and flesh together.  The spirit does not command the body -- it and the body are part of an indivisible whole, so this doesn't violate physics.

And so on.

Really, perhaps I should write an entire post about this ... what I've told you so far is a rather random selection of things!
banazir
Jun. 9th, 2003 08:29 am (UTC)
Sinteresting
However, I've come to the view that Christ, in His teachings and His general existence, embodies the concept of rejection of false dualism which is central to Zen Buddhism, and that the Catholic church at its best continues to embody this spirit.
Would you consider yourself a Zen Teilhardian?
I've lawaz been fascinated by the writings (and life) of Pere Teilhard de Chardin.
You might be interested in this site, from which I've learned a lot about ecumenicism and interdenominational doctrines and traditions.

For example, the concept of being God and man at the same time is a paradox in some ways -- as is the concept of God becoming bread as is supposed to happen in communion.
Or vice versa. Transsubstantiation is a very interesting, if idiosyncratic, tradition of Christianity. I suppose other religions have mystical transsubstantiation traditions, but I'm a bit pressed for time ATM to look any up.

These concepts are so confusing that they are often conflated, leading to occasional assertions of cannibalism (as though God became man as an intermediate step to becoming bread, whereas these are, in fact, somewhat separate).
True; I wouldn't go so far as to say "cannibalism", but the idea that the Eucharist is communion with God not through symbolic but through literal consumption of the body of Christ does seem to conflate the issue even as it underscores Christ's dual nature. I personally prefer not to take it too literally, but I understand it is actually a very important point in some denominations (RC included).

However, we ourselves embody this paradox daily in that we are sentient -- more traditionally, spirit and flesh together.
I will do as Hashberry (a TEUNC and friend of myself, istari_ala, mrowe, koinonia, etc) did for me and recommend Xenocide and Children of The Mind the last two books of the Ender Quartet (first canon of the Ender series) to you, if you haven't already read them.

Really, perhaps I should write an entire post about this ...
Please do!

what I've told you so far is a rather random selection of things!
I find I learn most about epople when they are being random. It's prolly the stochastic sampling researcher in me teunceing oot (I work on Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, including simulated annealing and genetic and evolutionary computation, among other approaches to machine learning).

--
Banazir
andrewwyld
Jun. 9th, 2003 08:33 am (UTC)
Markov Chains ... haven't heard about them in a long time.  Forgotten what they are, actually (probability seemed thoroughly intuitive right up to there ... not studied them since 1996, though!)

Teilhard de Chardin is one of the people I'd love to read about -- he seems to have been thinking along very similar lines to mine.  Thanks for all the sites!

What denomination, belief-set etc. would you say you favoured, then?
banazir
Jun. 9th, 2003 09:07 am (UTC)
Many Wibblings
Markov Chains ... haven't heard about them in a long time. Forgotten what they are, actually (probability seemed thoroughly intuitive right up to there ... not studied them since 1996, though!)
I'll psot aboat them in my next update.
Say, I meant to ask you this when you posted about info theory (which does indead have a vert voluminous skirt [1]): were you ever in any of David MacKay's curses at Cambridge?

Teilhard de Chardin is one of the people I'd love to read about -- he seems to have been thinking along very similar lines to mine. Thanks for all the sites!
Yer wlelcome.
Yew prolly knew that he spent over two decades in China?

What denomination, belief-set etc. would you say you favoured, then?
Goond qvestion, one that I am of course still working towards answering for myself. I am definitely theistic and consider myself Christian, but am personally non-denominational (very much so). My family has mixed religious backgrounds: three of my mother's six siblings are nominally Buddhist, two are devout Roman Catholics, and one is nominally Protestant. My father's mother was originally a Seventh-Day Adventist when she converted to Christianity, but she and my father's brother (IIRC) are now Baptists.

As for my parents and me, we belonged to Baptist congregations when we lived in Maryland and Florida (as you may know, the Southern Baptist denomination in the USA tends to lean very strongly to the political right). I started primary school (1978-1981) at Arlington Baptist Elementary in MD and continued (1981-1983) in a very conservative parochial Baptist school in central FL (creationist, etc.).

Around the age of 10-11, I realized that I didn't subscribe to some of the less tolerant political viewpoints (again rather common in the USA) and have since sought to study more broadly about Christianity and other religions, to get a more balanced perspective. One common but nontraditional view I do hold is that I tend to view Christian scripture as a product of human cognition (for the most part, divinely inspired but not the literally received word of God) and subject to human fallibility (interpretation as well as history-keeping and transcription). And here I should also be posting about this... later...

If you can believe it, I was influenced towards ecumenicism by C.S. Lewis's Narnia series: The Horse and His Boy and particularly The Magician's Nephew and The Last Battle. (OMG WTF LOL!!1!!!11!! Trask that Inkling, he's going to brun in hell! #-D)

[1] I'm thrying to avoid the Softrat putting "looker-upper of information theory's voluminous skirts" in my TEUNC title. #-D

--
Banazir
( 8 comments — Leave a comment )

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