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To anyone who has, or is earning, a degree in computer science:
What do you think is the bare minimum of topics that should be covered in a first course on discrete math or discrete mathematical structures?
Please list 3-10 topics, as specific or as as general as you like.

In other news: Today is the two-year anniversary of my GreatestJournal and the three-year anniversary of my LiveJournal.

Highlights, 27 Feb 2003 - 26 Feb 2004
(When I have more time, I will put 2004 and 2005 highlights here.)

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Banazir

Comments

banazir
Mar. 7th, 2006 12:22 pm (UTC)
Asymptotic analysis
Absolutely. I think in the first year or two, basic analysis of algorithms is many times more important for a CS major, or for a mathematical computing or statistical computing person, than covering fundamentals of real and complex analysis.

Being able to do fancy things with limits and abstract algebra, even number theory beyond modulo arithmetic, relative primaility, and concepts such as the Sieve of Eratosthenes for finding primes, can wait, IMO. A math major might learn it at the same time; but even she doesn't have to have it before understanding the most basic things about analyzing and dissecting algorithms to comprehend how to prove them correct and characterize their running time in a formal way.

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Banazir

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