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Emergent questions about grades

So.

Grades are in.

Why is it that there are more thirteenth-hour questions than there were eleventh-hour ones?

I mean, I know I try to put students at ease when they needn't be alarmed, just because some of them are very antsy, and some are just a little insecure. Some students should be worried, though! To wit: grad students on the brink of a C or undergrads on the brink of a D or F should hit the books (or come and check on missing homeworks or their absolute standing) before the final. It's easy to say "I didn't see a grade posting, so I just guessed (read: assumed) I was okay"; it's quite another to know you only turned in half the assignments or turned the hour exams in half blank and then count on the curve.

... right?

--
Banazir

Comments

banazir
May. 22nd, 2006 03:42 pm (UTC)
Grade inflation and dropping flunkers
At UIUC there is a feature of Rob Hasker's famous gradebook program gr, a version of which you can still find, with source code IIRC, on the net, that does "min > 0". This drops the no-shows on homeworks and midterms, even if they are still in the course.

In general, I think this is meaningful, and dropping 10%-ers and 30%-ers is less so.

My dad favored the "square root times 10" curve at National Taiwan University - I've never used it, but there is some sense to it, too.

Bottom line: a nonlinear scaling of grades is OK, as is lowering the cutoffs for A/B/C/D to 850/700/550/400 as I do. It's when you can pass, or earn a C, for having done no work, and just being qualified to come in the door, that I object.

--
Banazir

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