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Dover Books

I've got students and friends (e.g., zengeneral) who swear by these, and they look like interesting monographs, but all I can get out of them when I ask why is that "they're cheap" (i.e., much cheaper than textbooks) and "they're good".

Anything more specific? If anyone's got specific recommendations, especially a representative reading list, I'd love to hear it.

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Banazir

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
jeanlucpikachu
Nov. 16th, 2008 07:41 pm (UTC)
Mathematics for the Nonmathematician by Morris Kline could easily replace all 4 years of high school math.

Calculus - An Intuitive and Physical Approach also by Morris Kline was a much more useful book than any of the ones I used in my first 3 attempts to pass Calc I.

Concepts of Modern Mathematics by Ian Stewart is a quick survey of abstract math.


Those are the only 3 Dover books I own, but all 3 are pretty good. Did your students/friends have any specific recommendations? Or did they just mumble "Doooooover" while shambling in odd directions?
banazir
Nov. 16th, 2008 07:46 pm (UTC)
Dover books by Kline and Stewart
zengeneral has a whole collection, but they are mostly topology, algebra, and the like. I inherited:

A Collection of Problems in Mathematical Physics by B. M. Budak, A. A. Samaraskii, and A. N. Tikhonov

from my late advisor, Sylvian Ray, but that's the only one I have. Dan Roth, one of the UIUC faculty who founded the Data Sciences Summer Institute (dssi_mias), saw some Dover book about stochastic processes or some such topic and remarked that those were great.

--
Banazir
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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