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For A Few Surveys More

From melodysk by way of megpie71:

Boldface entries are the ones I have read (only 20); red ones, those that are high on my to-read list; gold ones, those that are medium priority, and green ones, those that I intend to read in the next 3-5 years (a total of 16).

1 Childhood's End Arthur C. Clarke
2 Foundation Isaac Asimov
3 Dune Frank Herbert
4 Man in the High Castle Philip K. Dick
5 Starship Troopers Robert A. Heinlein
6 Valis Philip K. Dick
7 Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
8 Gateway Frederik Pohl
9 Space Merchants Frederik Pohl
10 Earth Abides George R. Stewart
11 Cuckoo's Egg C.J. Cherryh
12 Star Surgeon James White
13 The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch Philip K. Dick
14 Radix A. A. Attanasio
15 2001 A Space Odyssey Arthur C. Clarke
16 Ringworld Larry Niven
17 A Case of Conscience James Blish
18 Last and First Man Olaf Stapledon
19 The Day of the Triffids John Wyndham
20 Way Station Clifford D. Simak
21 More Than Human Theodore Sturgeon
22 Gray Lensman E.E. "Doc" Smith
23 The Gods Themselves Isaac Asimov
24 The Left Hand of Darkness Ursula K. Le Guin
25 Behold the Man Michael Moorcock
26 Star Maker Olaf Stapledon
27 The War of the Worlds H. G. Wells
28 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Jules Verne
29 Heritage of Hastur Marion Zimmer Bradley
30 The Time Machine H. G. Wells
31 The Stars My Destination Alfred Bester
32 Slan A. E. Van Vogt
33 Neuromancer William Gibson
34 Ender's Game Orson Scott Card
35 In Conquest Born C. S. Friedman
36 Lord of Light Roger Zelazny
37 Eon Greg Bear
38 Dragonflight Anne McCaffrey
39 Journey to the Center of the Earth Jules Verne
40 Stranger in a Strange Land Robert A. Heinlein
41 Cosm Gregory Benford
42 The Voyage of the Space Beagle A. E. Van Vogt -
43 Blood Music Greg Bear
44 Beggars in Spain Nancy Kress
45 Omnivore Piers Anthony
46 I, Robot Isaac Asimov
47 Mission of Gravity Hal Clement
48 To Your Scattered Bodies Go Philip Jose Farmer
49 Brave New World Aldous Huxley
50 The Man Who Folded Himself David Gerrold
51 1984 George Orwell
52 The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyl And Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson
53 Snow Crash Neal Stephenson
54 Flesh Philip Jose Farmer
55 Cities in Flight James Blish
56 Shadow of the Torturer Gene Wolfe
57 Startide Rising David Brin
58 Triton Samuel R. Delany
59 Stand on Zanzibar John Brunner
60 A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess
61 Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury
62 A Canticle for Leibowitz Walter M. Miller Jr.
63 Flowers for Algernon Daniel Keyes
64 No Blade of Grass John Christopher
65 The Postman David Brin
66 Dhalgren Samuel R. Delany
67 Berserker Fred Saberhagen
68 Flatland Edwin Abbott Abbott
69 Planiverse A. K. Dewdney
70 Dragon's Egg Robert L. Forward
71 Downbelow Station C. J. Cherryh
72 Dawn Octavia E. Butler
73 The Puppet Masters Robert A. Heinlein
74 The Doomsday Book Connie Willis
75 Forever War Joe Haldeman
76 Deathbird Stories Harlan Ellison
77 Roadside Picnic Arkady Strugatsky
78 The Snow Queen Joan D. Vinge
79 The Martian Chronicles Ray Bradbury
80 Drowned World J.G. Ballard
81 Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut
82 Red Mars Kim Stanley Robinson
83 Upanishads Various
84 Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll
85 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Douglas Adams
86 The Lathe of Heaven Ursula K. Le Guin
87 The Midwich Cuckoos John Wyndham
88 Mutant Henry Kuttner
89 Solaris Stanislaw Lem
90 Ralph 124C41+ Hugo Gernsback
91 I Am Legend Richard Matheson
92 Timescape Gregory Benford
93 The Demolished Man Alfred Bester
94 War with the Newts Karl Kapek
95 Mars Ben Bova
96 Brain Wave Poul Anderson
97 Hyperion Dan Simmons
98 The Andromeda Strain Michael Crichton
99 Camp Concentration Thomas M. Disch
100 A Princess of Mars Edgar Rice Burroughs


From jelazakazone by way of celandineb:

34 that I've seen (shown in bold), 27 that I plan to watch in the next 2 years (with high, medium</b>, and lower priority).

1. Godfather, The (1972)</font></b>
2. Shawshank Redemption, The (1994)
3. Godfather: Part II, The (1974)
4. Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The (2001)
5. Schindler's List (1993)
6. Citizen Kane (1941)
7. Casablanca (1942)
8. Seven Samurai (1954)
9. Star Wars (1977)
10. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
11. Memento (2000)
12. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
13. Rear Window (1954)
14. Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002)
15. Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
16. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
17. Usual Suspects, The (1995)
18. Amélie (2001)
19. Pulp Fiction (1994)
20. North by Northwest (1959)
21. Psycho (1960)
22. Silence of the Lambs, The (1991)
23. 12 Angry Men (1957)
24. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
25. It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
26. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
27. Goodfellas (1990)
28. American Beauty (1999)
29. Vertigo (1958)
30. Pianist, The (2002)
31. Sunset Blvd. (1950)
32. Apocalypse Now (1979)
33. Some Like It Hot (1959)
34. Matrix, The (1999)
35. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
36. Taxi Driver (1976)
37. Third Man, The (1949)
38. Paths of Glory (1957)
39. Fight Club (1999)
40. Boot, Das (1981)
41. L.A. Confidential (1997)
42. Double Indemnity (1944)
43. Chinatown (1974)
44. Requiem for a Dream (2000)
45. Maltese Falcon, The (1941)
46. Singin' in the Rain (1952)
47. Bridge on the River Kwai, The (1957)
48. Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi (2001) AKA - Spirited Away
49. Saving Private Ryan (1998)
50. All About Eve (1950)
51. M (1931)
52. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
53. Raging Bull (1980)
54. Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)
55. Se7en (1995)
56. Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000)
57. Wizard of Oz, The (1939)
58. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
59. Vita e bella, La (1997) AKA: Life is Beautiful
60. American History X (1998)
61. Sting, The (1973)
62. Touch of Evil (1958)
63. Manchurian Candidate, The (1962)
64. Alien (1979)
65. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)
66. Rashemon (1950)
67. Leon (1994) (Known as 'The Professional' in the US)
68. Annie Hall (1977)
69. Great Escape, The (1963)
70. Clockwork Orange, A (1971)
71. Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The (1948)
72. Reservoir Dogs (1992)
73. Sixth Sense, The (1999)
74. Jaws (1975)
75. Amadeus (1984)
76. On the Waterfront (1954)
77. Ran (1985)
78. Braveheart (1995)
79. High Noon (1952)
80. Fargo (1996)
81. Blade Runner (1982)
82. Apartment, The (1960)
83. Aliens (1986)
84. Toy Story 2 (1999)
85. Strangers on a Train (1951)
86. Modern Times (1936)
87. Shining, The (1980)
88. Donnie Darko (2001)
89. Duck Soup (1933)
90. Princess Bride, The (1987)
91. Lola rennt (Run Lola, Run) (1998)
92. City Lights (1931)
93. General, The (1927)
94. Metropolis (1927)
95. Searchers, The (1956)
96. Full Metal Jacket (1987)
97. Notorious (1946)
98. Manhattan (1979)
99. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)
100. Graduate, The (1967)


Sixth Day of Christmas:
Good King Wenceslas - John M. Neale (1853)
(Yes, the Feast of Stephen is 26th December. I got thrown off a bit by the unicorns. :-))

--
Banazîr

Comments

( 16 comments — Leave a comment )
twinbee
Dec. 31st, 2003 09:22 am (UTC)
my thoughts on the lists: do you really have time for 100 books and 100 movies??!?!?
1 Childhood's End Arthur C. Clarke
epitomizes classic scifi. read it if you like that stuff. i read it in one sitting

2 Foundation Isaac Asimov
also very good, but i only read the first one

4 Man in the High Castle Philip K. Dick
good historical scifi

5 Starship Troopers Robert A. Heinlein
neat political scifi. again, one sitting

6 Valis Philip K. Dick
this is a pretty good book but im surprised it made it up here. not too many people have read this

7 Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
a must read for anyone

13 The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch Philip K. Dick
good reality-bending acid-like book

15 2001 A Space Odyssey Arthur C. Clarke
the movie is good. haven't read the book, though

16 Ringworld Larry Niven
mmm. I'm not into world building, but if you are this is the one to read

17 A Case of Conscience James Blish
been meaning to get around to it

23 The Gods Themselves Isaac Asimov
damned good

24 The Left Hand of Darkness Ursula K. Le Guin
i couldn't get into it. some weird planet where there are several sexes, i think. tone was too omniscient and boring

27 The War of the Worlds H. G. Wells
excellent socialist-propaganda scifi :-P

28 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Jules Verne
amazingly good for the time written. "submergeable water crafts?!?!"

30 The Time Machine H. G. Wells
see #27, but moreso

33 Neuromancer William Gibson
i think this deserves to be higher up. epitomy of cyberpunk thriller. lots of action. almost like reading a matrix movie

34 Ender's Game Orson Scott Card
hmm. i cant find these locally, but i desire them

37 Eon Greg Bear
i like greg bear a lot (see blood music) but i havent read this particular one

39 Journey to the Center of the Earth Jules Verne
40 Stranger in a Strange Land Robert A. Heinlein
both recommended

42 The Voyage of the Space Beagle A. E. Van Vogt -
haha. sounds neat

43 Blood Music Greg Bear
this is more of a short story or novella

46 I, Robot Isaac Asimov
you, tronkie, are required to read this book

49 Brave New World Aldous Huxley
of course

51 1984 George Orwell
ditto

52 The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyl And Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson
53 Snow Crash Neal Stephenson

58 Triton Samuel R. Delany
this one is not too good in my opinion

60 A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess
61 Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury
62 A Canticle for Leibowitz Walter M. Miller Jr.
63 Flowers for Algernon Daniel Keyes
these four are all neccessary reading

68 Flatland Edwin Abbott Abbott
NECCESSARY

75 Forever War Joe Haldeman

79 The Martian Chronicles Ray Bradbury

81 Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut

83 Upanishads Various

84 Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll

85 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Douglas Adams

89 Solaris Stanislaw Lem
see the movie too (the tarkovsky one)

96 Brain Wave Poul Anderson
good pulpy stuff. human intelligence increases nfold overnight. will we destroy ourselves?

99 Camp Concentration Thomas M. Disch

those are my picks for the books. now, movies:

!#1!Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
Godfather, The (1972)
Shawshank Redemption, The (1994)
Schindler's List (1993)
Citizen Kane (1941)
Casablanca (1942)
Seven Samurai (1954)
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)
Rear Window (1954)
Usual Suspects, The (1995)
Amélie (2001)
Pulp Fiction (1994)
North by Northwest (1959)
12 Angry Men (1957)
Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
American Beauty (1999)
Apocalypse Now (1979)
Some Like It Hot (1959)
To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)
Taxi Driver (1976)
Fight Club (1999)
L.A. Confidential (1997)
Chinatown (1974)
Bridge on the River Kwai, The (1957)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
Wizard of Oz, The (1939)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Vita e bella, La (1997) AKA: Life is Beautiful
Manchurian Candidate, The (1962)
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)
Annie Hall (1977)
Great Escape, The (1963)
Clockwork Orange, A (1971)
Reservoir Dogs (1992)
Jaws (1975)
Amadeus (1984)
Braveheart (1995)
Fargo (1996)
Blade Runner (1982)
Modern Times (1936)
Shining, The (1980)
Donnie Darko (2001)
Princess Bride, The (1987)
Lola rennt (Run Lola, Run) (1998)
Metropolis (1927)
Full Metal Jacket (1987)
Manhattan (1979)
Graduate, The (1967)
banazir
Dec. 31st, 2003 09:49 am (UTC)
Re: do you really have time??!?!? (trask, no)
OK, I will just reply to the ones I haven't read for now, to learn more and perhaps to restructure my list.

1 Childhood's End Arthur C. Clarke
epitomizes classic scifi. read it if you like that stuff. i read it in one sitting
Good.

4 Man in the High Castle Philip K. Dick
good historical scifi
MMV when it comes to historical. e.g., I want to read Turtledove, but there is just so trasking much AU fanfic that I feel as if I can't be bothered.

5 Starship Troopers Robert A. Heinlein
neat political scifi. again, one sitting
So I've heard.

6 Valis Philip K. Dick
this is a pretty good book but im surprised it made it up here. not too many people have read this
What's it about?

7 Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
a must read for anyone
Yes, of course.
I've read condensed versions of it, skimmed parts of it, and seen the Branagh film (which some of my friends hate). I just haven't read the whole original through.

13 The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch Philip K. Dick
good reality-bending acid-like book
Hrm. Reality-bending is all well and good, as is virtual acid, but could you be more specific?

15 2001 A Space Odyssey Arthur C. Clarke
the movie is good. haven't read the book, though
I've heard it really clarifies the film.

16 Ringworld Larry Niven
mmm. I'm not into world building, but if you are this is the one to read
Oh, my, yes.

17 A Case of Conscience James Blish
been meaning to get around to it
Read Cities in Flight first; it's the more popular Blish classic.

23 The Gods Themselves Isaac Asimov
damned good
I like almost all Asimov, but the blurb for this turned me off from it - it just doesn't seem to have as interesting a premise as Robots/Empire/Foundation.

24 The Left Hand of Darkness Ursula K. Le Guin
i couldn't get into it. some weird planet where there are several sexes, i think. tone was too omniscient and boring
So I have heard. Is this Earthsea, though?

28 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Jules Verne
amazingly good for the time written.
Yes, yes. I would rather read Journey to The Centre of The Earth, Around The World in 80 Days, or even From The Earth to the Moon first, though.

37 Eon Greg Bear
i like greg bear a lot (see blood music) but i havent read this particular one
OK.

39 Journey to the Center of the Earth Jules Verne
40 Stranger in a Strange Land Robert A. Heinlein
both recommended
#39 yes; #40 it's been drummed on me so many times that I'll have to give it a read to see what the fuss is all about.

42 The Voyage of the Space Beagle A. E. Van Vogt
haha. sounds neat
Sounds... odd. I keep seeing a Sopwith Camel doghouse in space.

43 Blood Music Greg Bear
this is more of a short story or novella
So, originally, was Beggars in Spain.

52 The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyl And Mr. Hyde Robert Louis Stevenson
53 Snow Crash Neal Stephenson
Yes?

58 Triton Samuel R. Delany
this one is not too good in my opinion
OK. Thanks.

60 A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess
62 A Canticle for Leibowitz Walter M. Miller Jr.
neccessary reading
Agreed.

68 Flatland Edwin Abbott Abbott
NECCESSARY
How so?

75 Forever War Joe Haldeman
OK.
81 Cat's Cradle Kurt Vonnegut
I haven't heard convincing cases for Vonnegut's plots, though he seems to be an excellent writer.
83 Upanishads Various
Yes? Your opinion?

89 Solaris Stanislaw Lem
see the movie too (the tarkovsky one)
OK!

96 Brain Wave Poul Anderson
good pulpy stuff. human intelligence increases nfold overnight. will we destroy ourselves?
/me nods
Have you read May's Pliocene Exile and Galactic Milieu series? Highly recommended (as is C. S. Friedman's In Conquest Born).

99 Camp Concentration Thomas M. Disch
What's it about?

--
Banazir
twinbee
Dec. 31st, 2003 10:19 am (UTC)
Re: do you really have time??!?!? (trask, no)
42 The Voyage of the Space Beagle A. E. Van Vogt
haha. sounds neat
Sounds... odd. I keep seeing a Sopwith Camel doghouse in space.
no i think its supposed to be like Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle about his trip to galapogos and the furutre of man

68 Flatland Edwin Abbott Abbott
NECCESSARY
How so?
this book prys open the brains of impressionable high school students and gets them interested in things like CS and string theory :P

sorry not posting more info now. will maybe later.


(the ones that i didn't include a description of are just books I've read and tecitly approve of)
banazir
Dec. 31st, 2003 03:04 pm (UTC)
Re: do you really have time??!?!? (trask, no)
42 The Voyage of the Space Beagle A. E. Van Vogt
haha. sounds neat
Sounds... odd. I keep seeing a Sopwith Camel doghouse in space.

no i think its supposed to be like Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle about his trip to galapogos and the furutre of man
Ah, yes, of curse.

68 Flatland Edwin Abbott Abbott
NECCESSARY
How so?

this book prys open the brains of impressionable high school students and gets them interested in things like CS and string theory :P
I read that ("[pries] open") as "pyres open". Must have Denethor on the brain. :-P
I was an impressionable HS student once, but it was acksherly nonfiction and speculative Omni-type writing (Fjermedal, Moravec, Drexler) that got me interested in CS and string theory.

sorry not posting more info now. will maybe later.
Ditto. Happy New Year to you and yours!

--
Banazir
banazir
Jan. 1st, 2004 06:10 pm (UTC)
Books I have had time for - 1 of 2
OK, now for the ones you commented on that I have read:

2 Foundation Isaac Asimov
also very good, but i only read the first one
The second and third are just as good, if a bit slow in parts of Foundation and Empire.
If you only read the Galactic Empire (Trantor/Earth) series:


  • The Stars, Like Dust - murder mystery set on Earth; early hegemony of Trantor (Galactic Era)

  • The Currents of Space - Trantor vs. Sark/Florina; mystery

  • Pebble in the Sky - guy pulled by a freak nuclear accident from 20th century Earth (1949 CE) to early Imperial Earth (829 GE) - this is the only one of the Empire trilogy that I have read



then the classic Foundation trilogy suffices. If you also read the Robot canon:



then you need the vincula, Robots and Empire and Foundation and Earth (along with the less memorable fourth book, Foundation's Edge).
I read Prelude to Foundation in 1991 and found it a little blah, so I didn't continue with the prequels, but I have them somewhere way down on my list (which isn't written down, BTW).

Here's the whole series.
BTW, have you read the Robot City series that was an homage to Asimov? I read the first three and really liked them - each is superlative in its own way.

27 The War of the Worlds H. G. Wells
excellent socialist-propaganda scifi :-P
Hehe, probably, but how do you mean?

30 The Time Machine H. G. Wells
see #27, but moreso
Oh, yes.
Is the film true to the book? Independently, is it any good?

33 Neuromancer William Gibson
i think this deserves to be higher up. epitomy of cyberpunk thriller. lots of action. almost like reading a matrix movie
Clearly the Matrix borrows from the book that coined the name (and arguably the concept), but the style is just too metaphorical and loosely non-technical for my taste. I read it and have stuck to (cf. Stephenson) since. Simmons's cyberpunk is like this, but more tolerable in its setting.

34 Ender's Game Orson Scott Card
hmm. i cant find these locally, but i desire them
Oh, they are good, especially Speaker for The Dead.
As I told wondergurl_77, I actually liked Xenocide and Children of The Mind, too, but be forewarned! OSC's science is very soft - designed to provoke hard thought about situational ethics and to make the reader take a stand, not to think too hard about biology or classical and relativistic physics (beyond "pop" metaphysics and cosmology).

46 I, Robot Isaac Asimov
you, tronkie, are required to read this book
Oh, I did - at the age of 11.

--
Banazir
twinbee
Jan. 1st, 2004 06:20 pm (UTC)
Re: Books I have had time for - 1 of 2
about HG Wells: He goes off on socialist tangents sometimes, like his characters will start talking about how the only way society will work is if it goes to a worker's collectivism, or like how this whole mess could have been avoided if there was a people's defense, or whatever selse. These segways seem very out of place and noticeable when you're reading the books.

I haven't seen the new time machine movie, but I saw the old 1960s one when I was a mere tronkling, and I have to say, I have no idea if its like the book :P

I agree that gibson can be extreme in the fantasy technology, but I like readig it because it reminds me of the sort of idealistic fantasy future world hiding behind the computer optimism of the early 90s.

..and I find asimov's series books hard to get into. I just cant pick up interest. The non-serial robot ones are sometimes enjoyable, though.
banazir
Jan. 1st, 2004 06:35 pm (UTC)
Re: Books I have had time for - 1 of 2
about HG Wells: He goes off on socialist tangents sometimes, like his characters will start talking about how the only way society will work is if it goes to a worker's collectivism, or like how this whole mess could have been avoided if there was a people's defense, or whatever selse. These segways seem very out of place and noticeable when you're reading the books.
I think I remember what you are talking about.
There is definitely that flavor in the Traveller's musings on the Eloi/Morlock dichotomy in The Time Machine. OTOH, Wells's vision of time travel to the future would appear to be deterministic.

One cannot choose but wonder. Will he ever return? It may be that he swept back into the past, and fell among the blood-drinking, hairy savages of the Age of Unpolished Stone; into the abysses of the Cretaceous Sea; or among the grotesque saurians, the huge reptilian brutes of the Jurassic times. He may even now--if I may use the phrase--be wandering on some plesiosaurus-haunted Oolitic coral reef, or beside the lonely saline lakes of the Triassic Age. Or did he go forward, into one of the nearer ages, in which men are still men, but with the riddles of our own time answered and its wearisome problems solved? Into the manhood of the race: for I, for my own part, cannot think that these latter days of weak experiment, fragmentary theory, and mutual discord are indeed man's culminating time! I say, for my own part. He, I know--for the question had been discussed among us long before the Time Machine was made--thought but cheerlessly of the Advancement of Mankind, and saw in the growing pile of civilisation only a foolish heaping that must inevitably fall back upon and destroy its makers in the end. If that is so, it remains for us to live as though it were not so. But to me the future is still black and blank--is a vast ignorance, lit at a few casual places by the memory of his story. And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers--shrivelled now, and brown and flat and brittle--to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and a mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man.

Yernow wot? I'd forgotten that the Epilogue was written by the Editor and not the Traveller! Hm.

I haven't seen the new time machine movie, but I saw the old 1960s one when I was a mere tronkling, and I have to say, I have no idea if its like the book :P
I think they extrapolated the Epilogue.
"Tronkling" - I like that. We teuncs would prolly say "troglet" (for tronkie + sproglet), but that evokes "troglodyte".

I agree that gibson can be extreme in the fantasy technology, but I like readig it because it reminds me of the sort of idealistic fantasy future world hiding behind the computer optimism of the early 90s.
<NOLD_GEEZER>Yew young whippersnappers! Bax in myyyy dayyyy...</NOLD_GEEZER>

..and I find asimov's series books hard to get into. I just cant pick up interest. The non-serial robot ones are sometimes enjoyable, though.
/me nods
Asimov's storytelling style is better suited to nonfiction. It's very expository and minimalist in description, unless he's in Durty Old Man mode. :-P

--
Banazir
banazir
Jan. 1st, 2004 06:12 pm (UTC)
Books I have had time for - 2 of 2
49 Brave New World Aldous Huxley
of course
/me nods
I got more out of this, in terms of dystopian cultural ideas, than out of 1984.
But that's prolly acos I'm Chonese. :-/

51 1984 George Orwell
ditto
/me nods
This was a low-entropy book. Very much a downer, but the film seemed almost... tame by comparison.

61 Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury
63 Flowers for Algernon Daniel Keyes

these [are] neccessary reading
Agreed.
I read the latter in 8th grade and the former between 8th and 9th grade, having seen a friend curiously enjoying her required summer reading.
Have you seen the film of Algernon? If so, how is it?

79 The Martian Chronicles Ray Bradbury
Ah, a classic.
Along with Something Wicked This Way Comes, I read this for a book report in 7th or 8th grade and was much moved. Remember the Martian astronaut radioing from a ship about to disintegrate?

84 Alice in Wonderland Lewis Carroll
I would say this is already a classic as well.

85 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Douglas Adams
This has to be a must, for the pop culture refs alone.

--
Banazir
(Deleted comment)
twinbee
Jan. 1st, 2004 06:24 pm (UTC)
Re: Books I have had time for - 2 of 2
i have seen A flowers for algernon movie. it was called "charlie". im not sure, but i think they also made one called 'flowers for algernon'. anyway, its been a while since i've seen 'charlie', but I think i remember an acid trip segway at the end of the movie that shouldn't have been there (it was made in the '60s). I dont remember it being particularly good--maybe about average for a summer movie of that time.
banazir
Jan. 1st, 2004 10:31 pm (UTC)
Re: Books I have had time for - 2 of 2
i have seen A flowers for algernon movie. it was called "charlie". im not sure, but i think they also made one called 'flowers for algernon'. anyway, its been a while since i've seen 'charlie', but I think i remember an acid trip segway at the end of the movie that shouldn't have been there (it was made in the '60s).
Ah, yes - that's the one I was thinking of.

I dont remember it being particularly good--maybe about average for a summer movie of that time.
Wlokay, I'll bite: how do summer movies of that time compare to the megablockbusters of today? Or the average lower-budget summer flicks of today?

--
Banazir
twinbee
Jan. 1st, 2004 10:53 pm (UTC)
Re: Books I have had time for - 2 of 2
heh, well back then the budget was a lot lower. the movies are a lot slower too. the best thing that i could compare it to would be a play. lots of dialog
banazir
Jan. 2nd, 2004 12:06 am (UTC)
Movies of the 1960s versus 2000s
heh, well back then the budget was a lot lower. the movies are a lot slower too. the best thing that i could compare it to would be a play. lots of dialog
Well, yes - I meant: do you consider that an inherent drawback or limitation? (Some of my cousins aged 14-22 do! It's ruther amazzling to me.)

--
Banazir
twinbee
Jan. 2nd, 2004 12:57 am (UTC)
Re: Movies of the 1960s versus 2000s
I like older movies more. I suppose its just a matter of taste, and also conditioning. I know that when I was younger I couldn't stand older movies, because they seemed boring, but then again I watched a lot of television then, and none at all now. I get annoyed with long action sequences in movies these days. Thats why I skipped the third matrix movie.
banazir
Jan. 2nd, 2004 01:07 am (UTC)
Re: Movies of the 1960s versus 2000s
I like older movies more.
Very good!
I like films of the 1960s and 1970s, but only a few B&W films really stand out in my mind.

I suppose its just a matter of taste, and also conditioning.I know that when I was younger I couldn't stand older movies, because they seemed boring, but then again I watched a lot of television then, and none at all now.
Ah. I watch about the same amount of TV, but older movies have grown on me.

I get annoyed with long action sequences in movies these days. Thats why I skipped the third matrix movie.
Aha!
Atalast, a tronkie who skipped it!
/me hi5s
(I'll wotch it eventrually. I just have higher priorities.)

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Banazir
(Anonymous)
Dec. 31st, 2003 10:17 am (UTC)
Eeenteresting...
I've seen all those movies (natch) at least twice and amazingly enough, I've actually read most of the books on that list as well.

Interesting that...

--
Danger is my middle name
banazir
Dec. 31st, 2003 03:40 pm (UTC)
Re: Eeenteresting...
I've seen all those movies (natch) at least twice and amazingly enough, I've actually read most of the books on that list as well.

"Magenta is inseign." -gondhir

Aye hafta agreen.
Fweek.
With pwitty neyebrows.

Interesting that...
Danger is my middle name

Yesh.
Have a happy gnu yeer, yer delicate-neyebwowed fweek. Heh.

--
Banazir
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